Victorian Crime Fiction, Sherlock Holmes, the modern detective novel and TV programme - Neil McCaw at CSI Portsmouth - 5 Nov.

CSI Portsmouth on Saturday 5 November 2011 where crime fiction meets crime fact, has a great programme of speakers lined up including international best selling crime authors, Mark Billingham, John Harvey, and Michael Ridpath who will be appearing with Pauline Rowson on a panel debate in the afternoon along with police, scene of crime and forensic psychology experts. In the morning there are some interesting and entertaining speakers and one of these is Victorian crime fiction expert, Dr Neil McCaw.

Sherlock Holmes fans are in for a treat because Dr Neil McCaw will be talking about Victorian crime fiction: the influence of Holmes and Conan Doyle.

Where did modern crime fiction begin? What or who kick-started the craving for the fictional detective both in novels and latterly on television? Whatever your ideas on this, unarguably one of the greatest fictional detectives is Sherlock Holmes.

Dr McCaw is Academic Director of the Arthur Conan Doyle Collection, Lancelyn Green Bequest, one of the largest collections of Holmes/Conan Doyle material in the world. He provides a fascinating insight into the role of Conan Doyle and Sherlock Holmes in the development of detective fiction as a genre in the C19th and C20th centuries.

Neil McCaw is Reader in Literature and Culture at the University of Winchester. His books include 'George Eliot and Victorian Historiography' (2000), Writing Irishness in Nineteenth-Century British Culture' (2004), 'How to Read Texts' (2008) and 'Adapting Detective Fiction: Crime, Englishness and the TV Detectives' (2010) in addition to a number of articles and chapters on C19th and C20th literature and culture.

See more information on CSI Portsmouth and the full programme. Saturday 5 November at John Pounds Centre, Queen, Street, Portsmouth

Tickets on sale from the Box Office + 44 (0)23 9268 8685.

Tickets cost £5 for the morning and £7 for the afternoon with a discounted ticket of £10 for the whole day which includes £3 off the price of a book bought at the event.

Comments